Next General Meeting: The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP)

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The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP) is the work of a group of injured workers, advocates and researchers who are uncovering and writing the history of the injured workers’ movement in Ontario.

In collecting oral histories and conducting archival research, the Project has captured memory and documented an important part of Ontario’s social history. It has also engaged injured worker activists and leaders in determining how what has been learned can be used to educate and motivate injured workers in current struggles for justice in the workers’ compensation system.

The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP) is the work of a group of injured workers, advocates and researchers who are uncovering and writing the history of the injured workers’ movement in Ontario.

In collecting oral histories and conducting archival research, the Project has captured memory and documented an important part of Ontario’s social history. It has also engaged injured worker activists and leaders in determining how what has been learned can be used to educate and motivate injured workers in current struggles for justice in the workers’ compensation system.

NEXT GENERAL MEETING:
Tuesday 13 December, 7 p.m.,Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street
twhp_injured02

The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP) is the work of a group of injured workers, advocates and researchers who are uncovering and writing the history of the injured workers’ movement in Ontario.

In collecting oral histories and conducting archival research, the Project has captured memory and documented an important part of Ontario’s social history. It has also engaged injured worker activists and leaders in determining how what has been learned can be used to educate and motivate injured workers in current struggles for justice in the workers’ compensation system.

The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP) is the work of a group of injured workers, advocates and researchers who are uncovering and writing the history of the injured workers’ movement in Ontario.

In collecting oral histories and conducting archival research, the Project has captured memory and documented an important part of Ontario’s social history. It has also engaged injured worker activists and leaders in determining how what has been learned can be used to educate and motivate injured workers in current struggles for justice in the workers’ compensation system.

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