Histories of Toronto’s East-End Workers – Oct. 9, 7pm

Tuesday, October 9, 7:00 p.m.
Ralph Thornton Community Centre
765 Queen St E. (east of Broadview)

** Note change from our usual location **

The area of Toronto east of the Don River has always had a rich, distinctive history. Its industries, its neighbourhoods, and its community institutions have all sustained a large working-class population. Come out to hear fascinating reports on three projects that explore that history, focusing on industry, health care, and community journalism.

 

Camille Begin, The Industrial History of the Dundas-Carlaw Neighbourhood
Heritage Toronto conducted research into the rich history of this part of Leslieville. They reached out to thousands of people who lived, worked, and sometimes played in the Dundas and Carlaw area, and heard from couples who met while working at the Carlaw factories and from entire families who were employed in the neighbourhood. Earlier this year Heritage Toronto unveiled a heritage plaque and accompanying self-guided walking tour to honour this history.

Simon Vickers and Ulli Diemer, The Ward 7 News Project
Ward 7 News was a community newspaper that circulated in Ward 7 (roughly the east downtown and Riverdale) between 1970 and 1985. Reporting on the everyday triumphs, struggles and anxieties that concerned residents in a largely working-class area during a period of intense social and economic change, the staff at Ward 7 News captured a version of the 1970s and 1980s that was not visible from city-hall. The project is a digital teaching resource based on this paper. The presenters willl describe how local stories can inspire interest in history by connecting students with the social/built space around them.

Carol Anderson, The South Riverdale Community Health Centre
The South Riverdale Community Health Centre has been providing a wide range of accessible health care services to the area’s working-class residents since 1976. Since its creation, the Centre has played an important role in safeguarding the health of both residents and the community, from “Get the Lead Out” campaigns to the creation of one of the first safe injection sites in Toronto.

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