The Myth of Vimy: War and Peace in Canada

The Myth of Vimy: War and Peace in Canada
With Ian McKay, McMaster University

JOIN US
Monday 10 April, 2017, 7 p.m.,
Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street

Workers have fought in wars. Workers have also opposed wars. On April 10 2017, we mark the 100th anniversary of the bloody battle of Vimy Ridge, where many workingmen died. Some voices are urging us to commemorate that slaughter as a noble, heroic struggle that “forged our nation.” Ian McKay, one of Canada’s most respected historians, debunks that myth in The Vimy Trap, Or How We Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Great War (a book he co-authored with Jamie Swift). He argues against using militarism to build patriotism. He reminds us how often Canadians preferred peace to war. He makes a loud, clear call to avoid glorifying war.

Lest we forget.

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Next General Meeting: The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP)

twhp_injured01

The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP) is the work of a group of injured workers, advocates and researchers who are uncovering and writing the history of the injured workers’ movement in Ontario.

In collecting oral histories and conducting archival research, the Project has captured memory and documented an important part of Ontario’s social history. It has also engaged injured worker activists and leaders in determining how what has been learned can be used to educate and motivate injured workers in current struggles for justice in the workers’ compensation system.

The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP) is the work of a group of injured workers, advocates and researchers who are uncovering and writing the history of the injured workers’ movement in Ontario.

In collecting oral histories and conducting archival research, the Project has captured memory and documented an important part of Ontario’s social history. It has also engaged injured worker activists and leaders in determining how what has been learned can be used to educate and motivate injured workers in current struggles for justice in the workers’ compensation system.

NEXT GENERAL MEETING:
Tuesday 13 December, 7 p.m.,Steelworkers Hall, 25 Cecil Street
twhp_injured02

The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP) is the work of a group of injured workers, advocates and researchers who are uncovering and writing the history of the injured workers’ movement in Ontario.

In collecting oral histories and conducting archival research, the Project has captured memory and documented an important part of Ontario’s social history. It has also engaged injured worker activists and leaders in determining how what has been learned can be used to educate and motivate injured workers in current struggles for justice in the workers’ compensation system.

The Injured Workers History Project (IWHP) is the work of a group of injured workers, advocates and researchers who are uncovering and writing the history of the injured workers’ movement in Ontario.

In collecting oral histories and conducting archival research, the Project has captured memory and documented an important part of Ontario’s social history. It has also engaged injured worker activists and leaders in determining how what has been learned can be used to educate and motivate injured workers in current struggles for justice in the workers’ compensation system.

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Talk: Women and the Challenge of a Socialist Jewish Voice to the Canadian State

Talk: Women and the Challenge of a Socialist Jewish Voice to the Canadian State

Book Launch with ESTER REITER

futurewithoutneed

Ester Reiter is a Senior Scholar in the School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University

 

Thursday, October 20, 2016
Nexus Lounge
OISE

252 Bloor St. West, 12th Floor

4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

 

Light refreshments will be provided

 

A Future Without Hate or Need brings to life the rich and multi-layered lives of a dissident political community. Many of the women in this secular Jewish community were activists who attempted to weave together their ethnic particularity – their identity as Jews with their internationalist class politics. They created lives filled with song, dance, literature, culture, politics, and concern for working people all over the world in their commitment to a just world and lasting peace.

 

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

 

Department of Social Justice Education, OISE, University of Toronto
Centre for Feminist Research, York University
School of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies, York University

RSVP: ea.sje@utoronto.ca

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